McGill University was founded in 1821 and now enrolls more than 36,000 students on its two Canadian campuses. The downtown campus is in Quebec, Montreal, and the Macdonald campus is in Ste. Anne de Bellevue.

Courses

Economic Botany (PLNT 203)
Study of plants which are useful or harmful to humans, their origins and history, botanical relationships, chemical constituents which make them economically important; their roles in prehistoric and modern cultures and civilization and possible impact in the future.

Environment and Culture (ANTH 206)
Anthropology : Introduction to ecological anthropology, focusing on social and cultural adaptations to different environments, human impact on the environment, cultural constructions of the environment, management of common resources, and conflict over the use of resources.

Environmental Archaeology (ANTH 504)
Study of long-term relationships between humans and their environments based on empirical evidence. Topics include review of methodological tools in paleoecological reconstruction, and approaches to evaluating human-environment relationships. Examples will be drawn from various subfields, including, but not limited to, settlement archaeology, human ecology, and landscape archaeology.

Ecological Anthropology (ANTH 339)
Anthropology : Intensive study of theories and cases in ecological anthropology. Theories are examined and tested through comparative case-study analysis. Cultural constructions of “nature” and “environment” are compared and analyzed. Systems of resource management and conflicts over the use of resources are studied in depth.

Economic Botany (PLNT 203)
Plant Science : Study of plants which are useful or harmful to humans, their origins and history, botanical relationships, chemical constituents which make them economically important; their roles in prehistoric and modern cultures and civilization and possible impact in the future.

Urban Horticulture (PLNT 312)
Plant Science : Selection, use and care of plants in urban environments for the benefit of urban populations: landscape design, turf and green space management, urban trees, green roofs and walls, design and management of community gardens, urban agriculture.

Global Issues on Development, Food, and Agriculture (AGRI 411)
Agriculture : International development and world food security and challenges in developing countries. Soil and water management, climate change, demographic issues, plant and animal resources conservation, bio-products and biofuels, economic and environmental issues specially in tropical and sub-tropical regions. Globalization, sustainable development, technology transfer and human resources needs for rural development.

 

Faculty

Timothy Johns (Department of Plant Science); tim.johns@mcgill.ca
Alan K. Watson (Department of Plant Science); alan.watson@mcgill.ca